FAQ

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Why choose Tecnotion?

General

Answer: Tecnotion is the global authority on linear motor technology. We are the world's only unbundled manufacturer of linear motors. A former part of Philips, we specialize solely in the development and production of linear motors. Because of this, our expertise, customer service and product quality are unmatched.

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What is a linear motor?

General

Answer: If you were to slice a rotary servo motor and lay it flat, you would have, essentially, a linear motor. The rotor with permanent magnets becomes the stationary part of the linear motor (also called the secondary, or magnet plate), and the stator, which contains the coil windings, becomes the moving part (also called the primary, or coil unit).

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What are the benefits of a linear motor?

General

Answer: Linear motors are also referred to as direct drive units, since the load is directly coupled to the motor. This eliminates the need for elastic components such as gearboxes and couplings, which introduce backlash and error in the motion. And because they do not rely on mechanical drive components such as ball screws, belts, and rack and pinions, linear motors have a much higher accuracy and repeatability, with no velocity ripple.

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What is an Iron Core motor?

Iron Core motors

Answer: An Iron Core motor is a linear motor which is designed and constructed with an iron core, these linear motors offer extremely high continuous force for their size, starting at 60N for the small TM, all the way up to 3000N for the water cooled TBW powerhouse. Peak forces are even higher, reaching up to 6000N.

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Why choose Iron Core?

Iron Core motors

Answer: Because Iron Core linear motors have a small air gap between the primary and secondary parts, their magnetic resistance is low and magnetic flux (force) is high. This gives them the ability to produce very high continuous forces. In addition, the design of Iron Core linear motors allows heat to flow from the laminate to the structure, providing good thermal management.

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What are the typical applications of Iron Core motors?

Iron Core motors

Answer: The high forces and low heat dissipation of Iron Core linear motors make them well suited for applications in machine tools, laser and water jet cutting machines and factory automation. Tecnotion’s low-cogging design also allows Iron Core linear motors to be used in large format printing applications, where smooth, precise motion is critical.

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What are the advantages of Iron Core motors?

Iron Core motors

Answer: Because Iron Core linear motors have a small air gap between the primary and secondary parts, their magnetic resistance is low and magnetic flux (force) is high. This gives them the ability to produce very high continuous forces. In addition, the design of Iron Core linear motors allows heat to flow from the laminate to the structure, providing good thermal management.

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Is it possible to couple Iron Core motors?

Iron Core motors

Answer: Individual iron core coils within one series and with the same motor constant can be coupled. This can be done on two separate magnet tracks for gantry type applications or on a single magnet track to yield more force. This last option is especially interesting for cost reduction in long stroke applications.

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What is the nominal air gap?

Iron Core motors

Answer: Tecnotion doesn’t specify the nominal air gap because of the casted finish of the coil unit and the magnet plate. This finish makes it difficult to get an accurate reading of the air gap with the use of a feeler gage. To get an accurate measurement Tecnotion advices to derive the air gap from the total mounting height.

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What happens if the air gap increases?

Iron Core motors

Answer: The air gap between the magnet plates and the coil unit can be increased to overcome tolerance issues in clearance or deviations in parallelism or flatness. Especially for large axis configurations this can be helpful. A larger air gab however decreases the power of the motor. The decrease in force isn’t linear and is different for the continuous force and the attraction force.

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What is an Ironless motor?

Ironless motors

Answer: In contrast to iron core motors, these motors feature an ironless coil unit, so there is no attraction force or cogging between the coil unit and the magnet track. This is what gives ironless motors their light weight, superior precision, a linear force constant and extremely dynamic velocity, acceleration and deceleration. Continuous force ranges from 10N all the way up to 846N with peak force of up to 4200N.

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Where does the name Ironless come from?

Ironless motors

Answer: Ironless linear motors are constructed, as their name suggests, without iron in the primary part (coil unit). The coils of the primary are embedded in a nonmagnetic core, and the secondary is typically u-shaped, with two magnet plates facing each other (also called a magnet yoke). The ironless coil unit moves in the space between the plates.

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Why choose a Ironless motor?

Ironless motors

Answer: The absence of iron in the coil unit provides several advantages over Iron Core linear motors. First, when an ironless linear motor is integrated into a linear motor system, the supporting bearings do not have to withstand attractive forces between the primary and secondary parts. The relatively low forces on the bearings result in a much longer bearing life.

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What are typical applications for Ironless motors?

Ironless motors

Answer: Individual Ironless motors within one series and with the same motor constant can be coupled. This can be done on two separate magnet tracks for gantry type applications or on a single magnet track to yield more force. This last option is especially interesting for cost reduction in long stroke applications. By coupling two coils a smaller series coil and magnet yoke can be used.

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Why choose for ironless vacuum?

Vacuum

Answer: A direct sibling of our ironless U-series, these vacuum rated ironless motors feature specifically designed coil units and magnet yokes for use in high vacuum, down to 10-8 mBar. Apart from the features carried over from our regular ironless motors: light weight and ultra-precision, this series is also capable of incredibly smooth motion and achieves the lowest amount of outgassing possible for a series product of this type.

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What is a vacuum motor?

Vacuum

Answer: A growing amount of high tech applications require vacuum solutions to minimize the chance of unwanted chemical reactions or pollution of the process or surrounding equipment. Motion is one of the main challenges within a vacuum environment. Serviceability, reliability, versatility and outgassing are critical factors in a vacuum application and failure of one of them could mean long downtimes.

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What is a Torque motor?

Torque

Answer: Torque motors are permanent-magnet direct drive motors that rotate along an axis. They can be used wherever a rotary movement is required and offer numerous advantages over conventional servo drives.

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Why choose for a Torque motor?

Torque

Answer: Due to the extensive motor design knowledge within Tecnotion, the QTR Torque series are ahead in development. Compared to other torque motors, the QTR series offers a superior torque density and stands out with its small size and weight. The QTR has a low build height and larger inner diameter while offering the same or higher torque specifications compared to other torque motors.

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What is an Moving Magnet motor?

Moving Magnet Motors

Answer: An Moving Magnet motor is an inverted linear motor utilizing a fixed coil track and magnetic movers, the MM-Series breaks a long standing barrier of linear motion by allowing the movers to follow a curved track. The movers can be controlled individually or in groups and can move completely independent of each other.

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What are the benefits of Moving Magnet motors?

Moving Magnet Motors

Answer: Because all movers can be controlled individually many kinds of applications are possible. Two movers can work together to perform a clamping action or use kinematics to manipulate materials. Separate movers can move with different speed, direction and distance between each other. This flexibility in movement paves the way to increasingly complex fields of application.

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What is cogging?

Definitions

Answer: Cogging is an result of the iron core motor design. The iron core has “preferred” positions relative to the magnets, and the motor must vary its thrust force to overcome these positions. This results in a motion that is less smooth than that of an ironless linear motor, and can be compared to moving over an old-fashioned washboard.For more details please see: “What is done to reduce the cogging effect of Iron Core motors?”

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What is Ultimate Force?

Definitions

Answer: The force generated by the motor beyond the saturation point in the non-linear area of the Motor Force Constant. The actual value of the Motor Force Constant at Ultimate Force is 26% less than the linear value. This is only applicable for Iron core motors. Efficiency of transfer of current to force is lower and causes the coils to heat up faster. For ultimate force the temperature increase is 10°C/s.

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What is Peak Force?

Definitions

Answer: For Iron core motors the peak force is the force generated by the motor just beyond the saturation point of the Motor Force Constant. The actual value of the Motor Force Constant is 14% less than the linear value. The coils will heat up with 6°C/s. Iron less motors lack a saturation point in the Motor Force Constant. The peak force is determined by the tolerated material expansion due to an increased temperature of the coil. For Iron core motors this increase is at 20°C/s.

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Continuous Force air cooled?

Definitions

Answer: The continuous force for a non-water cooled coil. At continuous force the heat gain and dissipation in the coil are equal. Dissipation occurs purely via conduction, convection and radiation. Tecnotion' linear motors continuous force is specified for a mounting surface at 20°C. The thermal resistance is 0,05K/W when mounted to an aluminium heat sink.

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Continuous Force water cooled

Definitions

Answer: At continuous force the heat gain and dissipation in the coil is equal. For Tecnotion linear motors the mounting surface needs to be at 20°C. The thermal resistance for water cooling is 0,02K/W when combined with an aluminium heat sink.

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What is motor constant?

Definitions

Answer: Ratio between force in Newton and dissipated heat in Watts [N^2/W]. A higher value of the constant implies that the motor dissipates less heat for the generation of a certain amount of force. The value decreases at higher coil temperatures. This is caused by increased Rph-ph winding resistance. S=(K^2/(3*Rph-ph)

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What is back EMF Phase-Phase_peak?

Definitions

Answer: Back Electro Magnetic force. A linear motor, when operated, also acts as a generator. The Back EMF describes the coefficient between the generated voltage and the speed of the motor [V/m/s]. When the generated Voltage is nearly equal to the bus voltage of the system the motor cannot run any faster.

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Temperature Sensor

Definitions

Answer: A temperature sensor can be used for monitoring the coil temperature. Iron core and Torque motors are fitted with KTY sensors. Ironless sensors are fitted with a NTC sensor.

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NTC temperature sensor

Definitions

Answer: The temperature sensors for the Ironless series. This sensor has no ferromagnetic components to prevent any attraction forces within the magnet yoke. This sensor has a negative coefficient between temperature and resistance.

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Temperature Cut-off sensor

Definitions

Answer: A cut-off sensor is used to protect the motor from damage due to overheating. The PTC-1k-type sensor has a positive coefficient between temperature and resistance. Near 110°C the resistance increases exponentially. The sensor output can be used as input for the controller to shut off the current to prevent damage to the coils.

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Resistance per phase

Definitions

Answer: The resistance value in [Ohm] of one phase of the motor. This value cannot be verified via the motor cables. The double value will be measured because of the star configuration of the motor

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Induction per phase

Definitions

Answer: The induction value in [mili Henry] of one phase of the motor. This value cannot be verified via the motor cables. The double value will be measured because of the star configuration of the motor.

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News, events & insights

High Torque in an even smaller package

Tecnotion introduces a new series of smaller QTR torque motors at the SPS IPC Drives 2017. A new 65 mm… Read more

To complete the circle

How does a linear motor move over a curved track? A seemingly complicated question with straight forward… Read more